Anemia is a blood disorder that occurs when your body does not have enough red blood cells to carry oxygen to your tissues. There are different types of anemia, the most common of which is iron-deficiency anemia.

As its name implies, iron-deficiency anemia occurs when there is too little red blood cells because of too little iron. Iron is an essential mineral needed by the body to make hemoglobin, a protein in red blood cells that carries oxygen to the body’s tissues. As a result, you may feel tired, out of breath and irritable. Conversely, chronic iron deficiency can lead to organ failure.

Iron-deficiency anemia is usually easily corrected by taking iron supplements in addition to increased consumption of iron-rich foods. There are two types of sources of dietary iron: heme and non-heme. Heme comes from sources that contain hemoglobin, such as meat, poultry and fish, while non-heme comes from plant sources. Your body absorbs the most iron from heme sources.

Below are 15 foods that have the highest iron content adapted from HealthAliciousNess.com. The current daily value (DV) for iron is 18 milligrams.

  1. Mollusks

Iron content per 3-ounce (85g) serving

Clams: 24mg (132% DV)

Oysters: 10.3mg (57% DV)

Cuttlefish: 9.2mg (51% DV)

Whelk: 8.6 mg (48% DV)

Octopus: 8.1mg (45% DV)

Mussels 5.8mg (32% DV)

Abalone: 3. 3.2mg (18% DV)

Scallops 2.5mg (14% DV)

  1. Liver (pork, beef, chicken, turkey)

Iron content per 4-ounce (113g) serving: 26mg (146% DV)

  1. Mushrooms

Iron content per 1- cup serving

Morel: 8.04mg (45% DV)

White Mushrooms, cooked: 2.7mg (15%DV)

Chanterelle Mushrooms: 1.8mg (10% DV)

Oyster Mushrooms 1.1mg (6% DV)

Shiitake Mushrooms, cooked: 0.72mg (4% DV)

  1. Dried fruits

Iron content per 1-cup serving

Apricot: 7.51mg (42% DV)

Peaches: 6.5mg (36% DV)

Prunes & Currants: 4.7mg (26% DV)

Raisins: 4.3mg (24% DV)

Pears: 3.8mg (21% DV)

Figs: 3.1mg (17% DV)

Apples: 1.3mg (7% DV)

  1. Seeds

Iron content per 1-ounce (28g) serving

Pumpkin and squash seeds: 4mg (23% DV)

Sesame seeds: 4.1mg (23% DV)

Sunflower: 2mg (11% DV)

Flax: 1.6mg (9% DV)

  1. Nuts

Iron content per 1-ounce (28g) serving

Cashew: 1.7mg (9% DV)

(Pine nuts: 1.6mg (9% DV)

Hazelnuts: 1.3mg (7% DV)

Peanuts: 1.3mg (7% DV)

Almonds: 1.3mg (7% DV)

Pistachios: 1.3mg (7% DV)

Macadamia: 1.1mg 0(6% DV)

  1. Lean tenderloin

Iron content per 3-ounce (85g) serving

Beef: 3.1mg (17% DV)

Lamb: 2.3mg (13% DV)

  1. Beans and pulses

Iron content per 1-cup (cooked)

White beans: 6.6mg (37% DV)

Soybeans: 8.8mg (49% DV)

Lentils: 6.7mg (37% DV)

Kidney beans: 5.2mg 0522 (29% DV)

Garbanzo beans/Chickpeas: 4.7mg (26% DV)

Lima beans: 4.5mg (25% DV)

Navy: 4.3% (24% DV)

Black Beans: 3.6mg (20% DV)

Pinto: 3.6mg (20% DV)

Black-eyed Peas: 3.6mg (20% DV)

  1. Whole grains

Iron content per 1-cup (cooked)

Quinoa: 2.8mg (15% DV)

Oatmeal: 2.2mg (12% DV)

Barley: 2.2mg (12% DV)

Rice: 2.0mg (11% DV)

Bulgur: 1.8mg (10% DV)

Buckwheat: 1.3mg (7% DV)

Millet: 1.1mg (6% DV)

  1. Dark leafy greens

Iron content per 1-cup (cooked)

Spinach: 6mg (36% DV)

Swiss Chard: 4.0mg (22% DV)

Turnip Greens: 2.9mg (16% DV)

Kale, Raw: 1.1mg (6% DV)

Beet Greens, raw: 0.9mg (5% DV)

  1. Chocolate

Dark chocolate (1 square/29g): 5mg (28% DV)

Cocoa powder (1 cup): 11.9mg (66% DV)

Chocolate bar (1.5oz/ 44g): 1.1mg (6% DV)

  1. Tofu

Iron content per 100 grams: 2.7mg (15% DV)

Iron content per 1 cup (126g): 3.4mg (19% DV)

Iron content per 1/4 Block (81g): 2.2mg (12% DV)

  1. Olives

iron content per 100 grams: 3.32mg (18% DV)

  1. Asparagus

iron content per 100 grams: 2.14mg (12% DV)

iron content per cup (134g): 2.87mg (16% DV)

iron content per spear (20g): 0.43mg (2% DV)

  1. Berries

iron content per 1-cup serving

mulberries: 2.59mg (14% DV)

Elderberries (13%)

Raspberries: 1.6mg (9% DV)

Blackberries: 1.3mg (7% DV)

Strawberries: 1.1mg (6% DV)

Raspberries/Blackberries/Loganberries/ Wild Blueberries: 0.9mg (5% DV)

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