A lot of people who wish to lose weight turn their backs on carbohydrates. If you wish to attain the figure of your dreams, refrain from following suit. You need carbs to supply your body with energy, thus allowing you to be physically active and get the exercise you need to effectively melt off fat and tone the muscles.

There’s no need to steer clear of cars and feel deprived for the sake of dropping pounds. All you really have to do is choose your carbohydrates very well. Continue reading to know some carb-rich foods that can actually help you slim down successfully. Remember to consume them in moderation, dodge foods that are packed with saturated fats and have your regular dose of exercise. Here they are:

Brown Rice

White rice may look prettier but brown rice is the winner when it comes to the nutritional profile. Brown rice supplies your body with good amounts of carbohydrates — with only 218 calories and 2 grams fat per cup (cooked). Brown rice also contains impressive amounts of fiber, protein and vitamin B6, as well as minerals like manganese and magnesium.

Kamut

A healthy alternative to brown rice is kamut. A cooked cup of this cousin to durum wheat packs as much as 52 grams of carbohydrates and 251 calories. Compared to other grains, kamut boasts of the most amounts of fatty acids that are good for the heart. Kamut also contains good amounts of protein, fiber, niacin and thiamin.

Farro

Popular among ancient Egyptians and today’s Italians, farro is a grain revered for its superb fiber and protein content. A cup of cooked farro contains 4 grams of fiber and 4 grams of protein. A serving is also loaded with 26 grams carbs and only 100 calories. Farro contains iron for red blood cell formation as well as calcium for stronger bones and teeth.

Quinoa

This well-loved grain packs double the amounts of protein in brown rice — a whopping 8 grams of it per cup (cooked). This is the reason why adding quinoa to your diet helps you build and maintain lean muscles. Quinoa also provides excellent amounts of fiber, folate, magnesium and manganese.

Oats

Whether old-fashioned or instant, the fact remains that oats are very good for you. A cup of cooked oats contains 32 grams of carbohydrates, and only 166 calories and 4 grams fat. Oats also contain protein, manganese and selenium. Top your bowl of oats with fruits, nuts or flaxseeds to boost the energy- and health-giving benefits.

Granola

What give granola a terrible reputation are the loads of sugar that food manufacturers add to it. When shopping, look for granola products containing minimal amounts of sugar. Without the added sugar, a cup of granola contains 597 calories and 65 grams of fat. A serving also packs vitamin E, phosphorous and manganese, as well as 18 grams protein.

Muesli

Every serving of muesli is very good for you because it’s a combination of various nutritious stuff —dried fruits, nuts and oats. Muesli is the perfect snack if you require energy because a 1-cup serving of if contains 66 grams of carbs. Other than protein and fiber, this tasty treat also yields vitamins E, B6 and B12.

Pearled Barley

It’s a wonderful idea to serve barley on the table during breakfast, say the experts. That’s because these healthy grains help keep your blood sugar level stable, which means you feel energetic throughout the day. Having a stable sugar level in the blood is good news for a weight-watcher like you because this means no unnecessary hunger pangs and overeating.

Buckwheat

When shopping for baked treats, opt for those that contain buckwheat. This is especially true if you are looking to have your body energized and your muscles built. That’s because a 1-ounce serving (dry) of buckwheat packs 20 grams of carbs and 4 grams protein. It also supplies the body with manganese, magnesium and copper.

Millet

If you need to steer clear of gluten, millet is a wonderful alternative to buckwheat. A 1-ounce serving of it contains 20 grams of fiber and 3 grams of protein, and only 106 calories and 1 gram fat. Millet is also a good source of manganese and copper, as well as the B-group of vitamins that help convert food into fuel.

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