We know that edible products such as food and medicines come with expiry dates. But little did we know that there household items that should not be kept for a long time because they too, have their own shelf life.

Let us identify the non-consumable items that come with expiry date.

Pillow

  • Your huggable and fluffy pillows have a short life span. Their longevity varies on quality and filling material, according to Neville Moore, Managing Director of an online bedding retailer.
  • Pillows made from cheap polyester can lose their supportive fluffiness over time. Hence, they need to be replaced as little as six months. Down-filled pillows tend to last long for up to five years while feather and wool pillows can stay up to eight years.
  • Using substandard pillows can lead to neck and back pain. If not washed properly and given the proper caring it needs, it can fill with dirt, oil, dead skin and dust mites that can trigger allergies such as asthma. A good pillow should support your head and neck and keep them aligned with your spine when you are lying down.
  • To know if you need to replace your pillow, do the “broken pillow test”. Fluff your pillow and fold it in half lengthways. Place a trainer on top of the folded pillow. It the pillow stays folded, it is time to purchase a new one. If the pillow bounces back, it is still in good shape and fine to use.

Bra

  • Well, ladies, our intimate buddies, our bras only last for eight months. A general manager for a bra company tells that your bra should never witness your birthday. No matter how you take good care of your high quality bra, the moment you wear them, they start to lose support and comfort.  They reduce their quality within 8 months.
  • It is recommended buying brassiere in darker colors because they last longer as compared to white bras. Dark colored bras tend to feel tighter and stay in shape longer than white bras due to the dyeing process it underwent. To preserve bra’s wiring, support, padding and elasticity, gently handwash it using mild detergent.

Toothbrush

  • Change your toothbrush after two to three months if you are not suffering from any gum or tooth problems. If you have bleeding gums, change it once a month. Don’t wait for your brush bristles to splay as they lose the ability to remove plaque that may cause damage to your gums.
  • Your toothbrush is a breeding ground of bacteria because of wear and tear as well as poor maintenance of it. To keep it in its top form, dentists suggest thoroughly rinsing your brush with warm water followed by a quick splash of mouthwash to help keep bacteria at bay.

Cycle helmets

  • For biking enthusiasts, there is no strict rule on how long you can utilize your helmets but expert recommended to replace it at least every three years to compensate for the general wear and tear. Also, if your bike helmet experienced dropping or any slight impacts, it should be replaced as the protective outer shield weakened.

Scourers or sponge

  • Replace your kitchen sponge every week. Like your toothbrush, kitchen sponge is another breeding ground of bacteria especially if it is moist. Using the same kitchen sponge can spread disease and can cause paralysis.
  • A smart tip in keeping your sponge’s bacteria to a minimum, rinse it thoroughly, squeeze out excess water and leave it on a clean surface. Allow it to air dry.

Trainers/ Athletic shoes

  • Your sporting shoes do not come with an expiry date, but they need to be replaced once they have been walked or run in for 500 miles.  The wear and tear will vary according to the terrain you have covered, your weight and gait.  It generally equates to six months of average wear.
  • Keep this tip in mind. Once the midsoles feel soft and do not spring back, you have to change a new pair of trainers.
  • To maintain the staying power of your trainers, do not put them in the washing machine or dry them on a radiator. This will affect the density of the supportive foam and can shrink the mesh and fabric. A quick wipe over and air dry is always the best.
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